Posts Tagged ‘Islamic Law’

Review of Gomaa’s Responding from the Tradition

Review of Responding from the Tradition: One Hundred Contemporary Fatwas by the Grand Mufti of Egypt, Sheikh Ali Gomaa (Louisville, KY: Fons Vitae, 2011) Rarely is the English language graced with a major contemporary scholar engaging a range of current concerns. Hence this work will be eagerly received in many quarters of the English-speaking world. […]

The Finality of Islam – With Reference to Perennial Philosophy

Finaility of Islam: Part I | Part II | Part III | Part IV Abul Hasan Ali Nadwi, in From the Depth of the Heart in America, noted that “Islam is more sensitive than any other faith . . . Its limits are marked out very clearly.” This sentiment has remained true until our day, even in western universities that teach Islam. […]

The Top Six Mistakes in Usul (Part 6)

Made by Students, Regular Muslim Folks & Many in Between: Part I | Part II | Part III | Part IV | Part V | Part VI Mistake #1: “There is only one right answer for every issue.” Differences of opinion among scholars are a natural and inevitable part of Islamic jurisprudence.  We discussed a number of reasons for […]

The Top Six Mistakes in Usul (Part 5)

Made by Students, Regular Muslim Folks & Many in Between: Part I | Part II | Part III | Part IV | Part V | Part VI Mistake #2: “The rules of Shari`ah should be constant and unchanging.” On the opposite end of the spectrum of what was discussed in Part IV of this series are those who […]

The Top Six Mistakes in Usul (Part 4)

Made by Students, Regular Muslim Folks & Many in Between: Part I | Part II | Part III | Part IV | Part V | Part VI Mistake #3: “All rulings change according to circumstances and context.” Another mistake people make when considering the rules of Shari’ah (Islamic law) is assuming that they are always subject […]

The Top Six Mistakes in Usul (Part 2)

Made by Students, Regular Muslim Folks & Many in Between: Part I | Part II | Part III | Part IV | Part V | Part VI Mistake #5: “Lack of knowledge is always a valid excuse.” Just as Allah the Exalted is generous, tolerant, and compassionate, we find His Law marked by the qualities of […]

Taqlīd, and Following a Madhhab

By Dr. Yusuf al-Qaradawi1 | Translated, with slight modifications, by Muslema Purmul Between Absolutism and Negligence Linguistic definition: Arabic linguists say that taqlīd is derived from the root word qalāda, which is a necklace that is fastened around the neck. From it comes the taqlīd of a road; it is as though the follower fastens the […]